Warm 2017 So Far

We aren’t typically quite this green this early but we’ve had an unseasonably warm Winter so far this year. We’ve really been green for almost the entire year it seems like. That’s not to say ALL of our fields are bright green but they’re getting there. Different fields are always a little bit different depending on the dirt, the rain, and the surrounding area (if it’s surrounded by woods or something). All those can make a difference in how the grass weathers the seasons.

Here are a couple of photos from one of our fields a couple of weeks ago on March 6th.

Y’all take care out there and keep us in mind for all your sod needs!

Photos From the Sky

Photos From the Sky

Everyone has a drone these days seems like and they do make some really cool photos. Here are a few from February of activity on the farm. Thank you Andres for these pics! Okay, yes the farm is mostly brown right now but what do you expect, it’s February! The fertilizer will give it some good green color as soon as we get some warm growing weather.

Winter is a Good Time To Plant

Winter is a Good Time To Plant

Just a reminder that the winter months are a great time to plant grass.  Yes, the grass you purchase will probably be yellow or brown because the warm-season grasses we grow in Texas turn dormant in the winter; but the grass is alive and healthy and can put down roots now and be ready to take off once the temperatures warm up.

And since the grass is dormant and we usually receive regular rains in the winter months the newly planted grass requires MUCH less water from you to get established!  Usually one good rain or watering from you right after you plant is all you will need to do this time of year.

Here’s a couple of pictures from grass we harvested on Thursday, January 31st.  You can see it has a little green color to it but it doesn’t have the normal bright green of spring.  But it is healthy and ready to be planted.

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We sometimes get asked why grass in neighborhoods is green but the grass in our fields is not.  We had a blog post on that in February 2011 about winter dormancy if you would like to read it; but as a refresher just know that neighborhoods with their closely packed houses and trees provide a great deal of protection for your grass.  The grass in our fields has zero protection from the cold and frost and therefore is generally going to be browner in the winter than neighborhood yards.

Thanks for stopping by our website and please give us a call if you are in the market for grass!